Aug 11, 2022  
2017-18 Academic Catalog 
    
2017-18 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Electrical Engineering Technology

  
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    EET-283 - Electrical Engineering Tech Co-Op 3

    3-9 credits
    This Cooperative Education course allows students to receive academic credit for off-campus educational work experience related directly to their major field of study.  Students who have completed 15 or more credits and who have achieved a 2.5 cum. QPA or higher are eligible to participate in Cooperative Education experiences. Approval for participation must be obtained from the applicable faculty coordinator and the Director of Cooperative Education.

  
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    EET-284 - Electrical Engineering Tech Co-Op 4

    3-9 credits
    This Cooperative Education course allows students to receive academic credit for off-campus educational work experience related directly to their major field of study.  Students who have completed 15 or more credits and who have achieved a 2.5 cum. QPA or higher are eligible to participate in Cooperative Education experiences. Approval for participation must be obtained from the applicable faculty coordinator and the Director of Cooperative Education.


Electronic Systems Engineering Technology

  
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    ELE-110 CCO

    ELE-110 - Electronics for Technicians 1

    2 credits
    This course introduces the principles of electricity and electronics. The topics include current, voltage, resistance, series and parallel circuits, schematic diagram reading, open and short circuits, magnetism, capacitance, relays, solenoids, motors and generators, and DC and AC signals. Emphasis will be on the practical application of basic principles and concepts as applied to modern systems and the techniques used to diagnose them. Additional subject matter will include diodes, transistors as control devices, solid state relays, wired logic, and sensor amplifier fundamentals. In the lab portion of the course students will develop the skills to use standard electronic test equipment to aid in the diagnosis of simple and complex electrical and electronic systems. Some circuit simulation will be used in the lab but the primary emphasis is on the use of test equipment on actual circuitry. Student will also develop proper soldering skills through various lab exercises.

    Corequisite(s): ELE 110L  

    Course previously known as: ESET-112
  
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    ELE-110L - Lab: Electronics for Technicians 1

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 110  .

  
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    ELE-111 CCO

    ELE-111 - Internet of Things (IOT)

    3 credits


    This course is an introduction to the Internet of Things (IOT) which is often called the Internet of Everything (IOE). The Internet of Things concentrates on the connection of various IOT “smart” devices to the traditional data networks. This is a “hands-on” introduction to the Internet of Things, sensors, and common IOT hardware. The course is a blend of electronic principles, the basics of using Raspberry PI and Arduino microcontroller boards, some basic programming concepts, connecting sensors, and sending data across wired and wireless data networks. We will save the data to servers on the Internet, Google spreadsheets, and cloud servers so we can access our data from anywhere in the world.

    Basic computer skills are required to take this course. No prior programming, electronic, or networking experience is assumed.

     

    Corequisite(s): ELE 111L  

  
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    ELE-111L - Lab: Internet of Things (IOT)

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 111 .

    Corequisite(s): ELE 111  .

  
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    ELE-115 CCO

    ELE-115 - Electronics for Technicians 2

    2 credits
    This course introduces the principles of embedded controllers, smart sensors and process control systems. Such components are the heart of modern day electronic and electro-mechanical systems and can be found extensively in fields such as automotive, HVAC, medical instrumentation equipment, remote monitoring (such as weather station and utility infrastructure), consumer/commercial/industrial electronics, high tech manufacturing processes, and anywhere sensors and data acquisition are required. Students will study complete systems including sensors, PIC controllers, motors, relays, actuators, indicators and display devices. Students will also develop an understanding of bus systems, control system feedback, electro-mechanical systems and simple programming concepts. Programming will be kept to a minimum as the emphasis will be on how the different components of the system connect and communicate. In the lab portion of the course students will build, test and trouble-shoot various PIC based sensor and actuator systems. Special emphasis will be place on systems that are directory applicable to consumer, industrial and commercial systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ELE-110 ;

    Corequisite(s): ELE 115L  

    Course previously known as: ESET-212
  
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    ELE-115L - Lab: Electronics for Technicians 2

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 115  .

  
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    ELE-120

    ELE-120 - Printed Circuit Design

    3 credits
    In this course students will form teams to learn and perform electronics industry practice regarding the design fabrication, assembly, and testing of printed circuit boards (PCBS). Student teams will capture, read, and edit schematics, design PCB physical layout, order and receive PCBs, and assemble (including soldering) and test the finished design. Throughout the course student teams will participate in design reviews and regularly report progress and problems to a project manager (instructor). Some aspects of the course will parallel ELE 130  . This course is recommended for students interested in creating their own circuit boards to implement electronic maker projects. No prior experience with electronics is required but general experience with personal computers is helpful.

  
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    ELE-121 CCO

    ELE-121 - Technical Documents Using Word

    1 credits
    This course is an introduction to using a word processor to build and maintain technical documents that conform to corporate style requirements. The course begins with a very quick coverage of the core features of Microsoft Word. We then cover the departmental documentation standard for word processor documents, font basics, the creation and application of styles, tables of data, table of contents, auto numbering, and document versioning. Importing and exporting graphics, technical drawings, schematics, and spreadsheets into the documents will be covered. Printing to hardcopy and PDF’s are required. OpenOffice and the Open Document standard will also be presented in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): DWT-099  and Basic MS Windows

    Course previously known as: ESET-151
  
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    ELE-122 CCO

    ELE-122 - Technical Documents Using Visio

    1 credits
    This course is an introduction to using Visio to build and maintain technical drawings that conform to corporate style requirements. The course begins with a very quick coverage of the core features of Microsoft Visio. We then cover the departmental documentation standard for drawings, font basics, the creation and application of styles, tables of data, technical calculations, annotations, common symbols, and document versioning. Importing data from external sources, exporting to common graphical formats will be covered. Printing to hardcopy and PDF’s are required. OpenOffice and the Open Document standard will also be presented in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): DWT-099  and Basic MS Windows

    Course previously known as: ESET-152
  
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    ELE-123 CCO

    ELE-123 - Technical Documents Using Excel

    1 credits
    This course will show students how MS Excel can be used for technical applications. The basic concept of a spreadsheet will be explained and then students will build their own spreadsheets to help solve real world technical problems. Students will learn and understand how to save, load, import and export files as *.xls, *.csv, tab delimited and other popular file formats. Other specific topics of discussion will include formula entry of trigonometric, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential and other scientific equations. Statistical data analysis will also be presented and used throughout the course. Students will then investigate various ways to represent data with linear and non-linear axes.

    Prerequisite(s): DWT-099 , MAT-087  and Basic experience with MS Windows.

    Course previously known as: ESET-153
  
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    ELE-130 CCO

    ELE-130 - Introduction to Project Management

    2 credits
    This course will introduce the student to key aspects of project management as related to electronics based technologies. The course will begin with a discussion of the environment in which most projects are initiated and completed, that is, a typical company. Discussions will include such topics as Concurrent Engineering, Quality Issues, being a “team player”, and various approval agencies & standards (NEC, UL, ISO 9000, etc.). Project scheduling will be discussed and students will be required to create schedules using both Gantt and PERT/CPM charts. Microsoft Project will be introduced and students will learn to use this software to schedule simple tasks. The lab portion of the course will give students some practical technical skills to help support the concepts presented in lecture. Students will learn soldering fundamentals, be introduced to technical documentation, reading schematics and assembly documentation, assemble and test various kits, perform cable termination and be introduced to testing techniques using DVM’s and dedicated test equipment.

    Corequisite(s): ELE 130L  

    Course previously known as: ESET-165
  
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    ELE-130L - Lab: Introduction to Project Management

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 130  .

  
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    ELE-160 CCO

    ELE-160 - Embedded Controllers

    3 credits
    This course will begin with a brief introduction to number systems and simple Boolean logic operations and devices. The course will then introduce and concentrate on the use of PICs peripheral interface controllers) in modem day systems. A PlC is a self-contained computer system on an integrated circuit chip, consisting of input & output ports, RAM & ROM, and a CPU core that is usually RISC based. Students will first learn how the PlC’s can replace simple combination logic circuits and then build upon this knowledge to have them perform more complex tasks. The student will program the PlC using a high-level language (BASIC), communicate between the PlC & the PC via serial ports (RS-232 & USB) and evaluate, debug and modify their programs. Students will use the PlC’s to implement combinational and sequential logic designs, simple data acquisition operations, investigate output types and simple open and closed-loop feedback control systems.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-087  

    Corequisite(s): ELE-165  

    Course previously known as: ESET-261
  
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    ELE-165 - Embedded Controllers Lab

    1 credits
    This course will begin with a brief introduction to number systems and simple Boolean logic operations and devices. The course will then introduce and concentrate on the use of PICs peripheral interface controllers) in modem day systems. A PlC is a self-contained computer system on an integrated circuit chip, consisting of input & output ports, RAM & ROM, and a CPU core that is usually RISC based. Students will first learn how the PlC’s can replace simple combination logic circuits and then build upon this knowledge to have them perform more complex tasks. The student will program the PlC using a high-level language (BASIC), communicate between the PlC & the PC via serial ports (RS-232 & USB) and evaluate, debug and modify their programs. Students will use the PlC’s to implement combinational and sequential logic designs, simple data acquisition operations, investigate output types and simple open and closed-loop feedback control systems.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-087  

    Corequisite(s): ELE-160  

    Course previously known as: ESET-266
  
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    ELE-180 CCO

    ELE-180 - Instrumentation and Measurement

    3 credits
    This course will present the student with the theory and practical skills necessary to understand the principles of electronic instrumentation and measurement. The course will begin with an overview of measurement principles, significant figures, units of measure, metric prefixes, typical electronic measuring instruments and their proper use. The comparison between theoretical expectations and practical measurements will be emphasized and students will develop the tools to understand potential sources of error. Course material will include a discussion on the operation of thermistors, light sensors, opto-electronic devices, hall effect devices, strain gauges, accelerometers, contact and non-contact measurement, humidity sensors, sonic & ultra sonic devices, DAC’s and ADC’s and sampling theory. A three hour lab will be required as part of this course. In the lab proper and safe lab and measurement techniques will be presented. Students will be required to understand how the instrumentation can affect the measuring process, and where possible, account for that error.

    Prerequisite(s): ELE 110 /ELE 110L  or permission of instructor.

    Corequisite(s): ELE-180L

    Course previously known as: ESET-271
  
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    ELE-180L - Lab: Instrumentation & Measurement

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 180 .

    Corequisite(s): ELE-180.

  
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    ELE-210 CCO

    ELE-210 - Circuit Theory

    3 credits
    This course and lab will investigate the traditional electronic circuit theories necessary to understand the operation of modem electronic components, circuits and systems. Information will be presented with an emphasis on signal processing application. Topics will include: KYL,, KCL, Superposition, Thevenin & Norton equivalents, real & imaginary numbers, impedance, magnitude and phase response of circuits, filter types & applications, pulse analysis, transient analysis, steady-state analysis, Fourier Analysis, dB measurement and semiconductor fundamentals. Students will use software to simulate circuits and help solve/verify equations. In the lab students will make use of modem test equipment controlled by LabView software to perform data acquisition and then use MS Excel to tabulate, analyze and graph the data. Students will be required to perform the experiments, maintain a lab notebook and submit formal lab reports.

    Prerequisite(s): ESET-141 , ESET-145 , ELE-123 , ELE-180 , and MAT-125  

    Corequisite(s): ELE 210L  

    Course previously known as: ESET-341
  
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    ELE-210L - Lab: Circuit Theory

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 210  .

  
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    ELE-220 CCO

    ELE-220 - Communications Systems

    3 credits
    This course consists of a study of modem electronic telecom/communications systems used for the transmission of analog information and data. First, the student is introduced to the basic components of a telecommunications system through a block diagram model. Fundamental concepts of signals, noise, bandwidth, and channel are introduced. Sub-systems which are peculiar to electronic telecommunications systems are covered with emphasis given to the concepts of filter theory, system frequency response, dBs, and signal bandwidth. Specific electronic modulation schemes are now discussed. Emphasis is given to the most important legacy pass-band systems; analog, amplitude and frequency modulation, and the most important present day base-band systems; analog pulse and digital modulation. The theory of operation behind each system, the practical implementation, and the relative merits of each are examined and analyzed completely. The course concludes with a discussion of modem multiplexing and access techniques and, an introduction to EM propagation, wireline transmission line concepts, fiber-optic communications systems, present day telecomm networks, and basic antenna theory. The lab portion of the course will provide hands-on experience with many of the topics discussed in lecture.

    Corequisite(s): ELE 220L  

    Course previously known as: ESET-344
  
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    ELE-220L - Lab: Communications Systems 1

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 220  .

  
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    ELE-225 CCO

    ELE-225 - Home and Small Business Networking

    2 credits
    This course covers topics commonly encountered in home and small business Internet Protocol (IP) networks. The aspects of Home Technology Integration (HTI) covering technologies such as home security, audio and video, home computers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning), and home control often use IP networking. Small businesses require networks of computers and often have remote locations. This course will provide the students with the skills necessary to work with common network configurations of personal computers, printers, small routers, and specialized devices. Students interested in enterprise class networking should consider the Cisco Networking courses (CSCO-100 - Cisco Networking 1  CSCO-200 - Cisco Networking 2  CSCO-300 - Cisco Networking 3  CSCO-300 - Cisco Networking 3  ). Course topics covered include an introduction to physical wiring, network switches, IP networking and determining the settings for existing networks. Hands-on experience with the installation & configuration of common network clients for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux will be covered. Common network settings, testing the network connections, and test procedures for these operating systems will be covered. Using and configuring home and small business routers, wireless access points, basic wireless security, network printing and shared drives. CSE-110  is recommended as a foundation. Please contact the Electronic Systems Group esg@stcc.edu for possible waiver of this prerequisite.

    Prerequisite(s): CSE-110 ;

    Corequisite(s): ELE 225L  

    Course previously known as: ESET-353
  
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    ELE-225L - Lab: Home and Small Business Networking

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 225  .

  
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    ELE-230 CCO

    ELE-230 - Wireless Networks

    2 credits
    This course will introduce the student to the fundamentals of wireless networks typically used for data transmission applications in an industrial, clinical, or home setting and also those networks used to implement cyber-physical system applications (i.e applications of the Internet of Things or IoT). Starting with an introduction to the concepts of wireless networking, the student is quickly introduced to the ideas of radio frequency (RF) signals, the frequency bands used for networking, and fundamentals of digital modulation techniques. The function of the wireless networking physical layer components (i.e. system hardware: transmitter, receiver, transmission lines, and antennas and the basics of electromagnetic (EM) propagation) are presented and related to the particular wireless system application and associated frequency band of operation. Present day wireless cellular technology (i.e 4G and soon to be implemented 5G) are introduced first and then most prevalent IEEE wireless networking standards (IEEE 802.11.X, IEEE 802.15.X and IEEE 802.16.X are covered. Emphasis is placed on the Wi-Fi networking standard (IEEE 802.11.X) and personal area networking standard (IEEE 802.15.X) for home, industrial, and cyber-physical applications. In lab, students are introduced to basic test and measurement equipment used in this field and the fundamentals of wireless system operation. Additional lab work will include setting up, deployment, and testing of various wireless networks.

    Corequisite(s): ELE-230L

  
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    ELE-230L - Lab: Wireless Networks

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 230 .

    Corequisite(s): ELE 230  .

  
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    ELE-240 CCO

    ELE-240 - Sensors and Data Acquisition

    3 credits
    This course deals with the practical design and operational theory of sensor and instrument based modem data acquisition and test measurement systems. Topics will include basic sensor theory, advanced electronics instrumentation, signal conditioning and interfacing techniques using op-amp and IC subsystems, measurement techniques and standards, ADC’s and DAC’s, and the fundamentals of PC and PIC micro-controller based measurement systems. The students will use LabView software in the laboratory portion of the course.

    Prerequisite(s): ESET-141 , ESET-145 , CSE-110 , ELE-160 , ELE-165  and ELE-180 ;

    Corequisite(s): ELE 240L  

    Course previously known as: ESET-371
  
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    ELE-240L - Lab: Sensors and Data Acquistion

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 240  .

  
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    ELE-250 CCO

    ELE-250 - Project Research and Development

    2 credits
    The purpose of this course is two-fold. First, students will investigate key aspects of project development: research, developing design specs, project scheduling, preliminary design/simulation, component selection, construction considerations, prototype development, design verification & testing and design improvement and performance monitoring. Students will investigate these ideas by way of a project example. The second goal for this course is to allow students to complete the first several stages of their capstone senior project design. Students will use the concepts presented in the beginning of the course to select, spec and order the components needed for their senior project in ELE-265 . Only students expecting to graduate in the following Spring should take this course.

    Prerequisite(s): ESET-141 , ESET-145  or permission of instructor.

    Corequisite(s): ELE-210  

    Course previously known as: ESET-365
  
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    ELE-260 CCO

    ELE-260 - Sensor Systems

    3 credits
    This course introduces the student to the technology sub-systems used to create complex networked sensor systems. First, sensor technology that includes embedded intelligence will be discussed with practical and operational aspects of these systems discussed. The student will then be presented an overview of the various lP-based networking technologies (i.e. LANs, MANs, WANS, etc.) and the various different transmission media that are used to interconnect typical standard information technology systems. Next, proprietary networking schemes used by the different major industries (i.e. automotive, process control, health, HVAC, etc.) are introduced. Some of the topics covered will include CAN, Fieldbus, Profibus, and HART network technologies. Emerging Zigbee (IEEE 802.15.4) technology and other wireless mesh technologies will be introduced. The student will be tasked with the construct a practical working sensor system project during the laboratory portion of the course.

    Prerequisite(s): ELE-240  

    Corequisite(s): ELE 260L  

    Course previously known as: ESET-471
  
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    ELE-260L - Lab: Sensor Systems

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 260  .

  
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    ELE-265 CCO

    ELE-265 - Senior Projects in E.S.E.T.

    1 credits
    This capstone course is designed to combine the concepts, theories and practices developed throughout the course of study in the ESET program and apply them to the development of a group project. Students will be required to keep a notebook and make weekly written project progress reports and monthly oral presentations of their work. A final written report and oral presentation will be required. The lecture will deal with topics relevant to project research and presentation. The five lab hours will provide student time to develop their project.

    Prerequisite(s): ELE-220   and ESET-355  . Student must be a candidate for graduation in May or permission of instructor, Devices, Circuits and Systems and Data Acquisition and Control.

    Corequisite(s): ELE 265L  

    Course previously known as: ESET-465
  
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    ELE-265L - Lab: Senior Projects in E.S.E.T.

    2 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of ELE 265  .


Energy Systems

  
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    EST-100 CCO

    EST-100 - Theory of Controls

    3 credits
    A course designed to deal with basic theories and concepts required by both air conditioning and heating servicemen. Topics include: Basic electricity, meters, principles of motor operation transformers and relays, along with an introduction to control circuits. These studies are essential in order that the individual comprehends the control circuits to which he or she will be exposed in future courses.

    Corequisite(s): EST-102 /EST 102L , MAT 078  or MAT 073  (minimum grade C-) or placement at Algebra I or higher on the math placement test.

    Course previously known as: ENGY-110
  
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    EST-101 CCO

    EST-101 - Combustion Control Circuits

    3 credits
    Domestic and light commercial heating control system for steam, forced warm air and forced hot water, and the components which makes up each control system are covered in detail. Residential and commercial oil burners and their components, thermostats, and basic trouble- shooting are also covered during this semester.

    Prerequisite(s): EST-100 ;

    Course previously known as: ENGY-220
  
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    EST-102 CCO

    EST-102 - Energy Systems Lab 1

    1 credits
    This course deals with the development of the manual and technical skills required in the heat/power/air conditioning industry. Attention is given to current principles and practices that apply to the care and use of hand tools and measuring devices, basic machines, tubing and piping, soldering, equipment services and installation, fundamental electric circuit wiring and field service training.

    Corequisite(s): EST 102L  

    Course previously known as: ENGY-120
  
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    EST-102L - Lab: Energy Systems Lab 1

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of EST 102  .

  
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    EST-103 CCO

    EST-103 - Energy Systems Lab 2

    1 credits
    An advanced course that is predominantly a toward the student achieving competency in specialized skill areas, including electrical control wiring, oil burner installation and servicing, and heating system-related components installation. Specific lab assignments directed toward installation and setup of residential and commercial control systems.

    Prerequisite(s): EST-102 ;

    Corequisite(s): EST 103L  

    Course previously known as: ENGY-230
  
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    EST-103L - Lab: Energy Systems Lab 2

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of EST 103  .

  
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    EST-200 CCO

    EST-200 - Principles of Refrigeration

    2 credits
    The science of refrigeration is based on physics, chemistry, and the transfer of heat which forms the foundation for an understanding of the refrigeration process. After these principles are learned in the first few weeks, emphasis is placed on the refrigeration cycle and its components. A study is made of the properties of the refrigerants that are used in the different applications, and of the instruments that are necessary in the servicing of these systems, both domestic and commercial. Extensive lab assignments also bring to the students a hands-on approach to the analyzing and servicing of refrigeration and air conditioning systems.

    Corequisite(s): EST 200L  

    Course previously known as: ENGY-240
  
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    EST-200L - Lab: Principles of Refrigeration

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of EST 200  .

  
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    EST-201 CCO

    EST-201 - Fund of Air Conditioning

    2 credits
    With the knowledge gained in Principles of Refrigeration (  ), a more advanced study is emphasized through extensive lab assignments dealing with the larger systems. Motor and motor safety controls, as well as other related electrical components, including relays, contractors, and transformers. Schematics and testing instruments, are used in performing service and diagnostic functions. The lecture series is an in-depth study concerned with the application of the engineering principles used in the design of conditioning systems. These include psychometrics, building surveys and load estimating procedures, ductwork and air distribution systems.

    Prerequisite(s): EST-200 ;

    Corequisite(s): EST 201L  

    Course previously known as: ENGY-340
  
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    EST-201L - Lab: Fund of Air Conditioning

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of EST 201  .

  
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    EST-202 CCO

    EST-202 - Power Plant Operations

    3 credits
    An extensive study is made of the complex systems that make up the steam generation plant. Emphasis is placed on: boiler and steam generators and their classification and structural design, applied mechanics and related equipment such as heaters, receivers, pumps and piping systems. Combustion and the transfer of heat released by the burning of fuels requires a study of thermodynamics and the heat capacities of different substances. Steam tables and other charts are used. Chimneys and the mechanical draft equipment required for the combustion process are also studied.

    Course previously known as: ENGY-330
  
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    EST-203 CCO

    EST-203 - HVAC Electrical Applications

    3 credits
    The course will offer the student the ability to utilize the theory from previous courses in real world electrical HVAC applications. Course content will include further and continued study of electrical systems and circuitry including: controls, schematics, troubleshooting and computer based system analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): EST-100  and EST-200 ;

    Course previously known as: ENGY-435
  
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    EST-204 CCO

    EST-204 - Heating System Design

    3 credits
    A lecture course designed to acquaint the student with the proper principles used in designing heating systems. A thorough coverage is made of heat transfer through building materials essential in the calculations of heat losses, for both residential and commercial structures. The student will develop the knowledge required to design efficient heating systems.

    Course previously known as: ENGY-320
  
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    EST-205 CCO

    EST-205 - Adv. Heating System Design

    4 credits
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with proper principles and procedures in designing steam and hot water heating systems. Topics include specifications and data for piping and heating system components such as boilers, heat distributing units, pumps, valves, and fittings. Instruction is given in the layout of one-pipe steam systems, series loop and one- pipe venturi forced hot water systems, and radiant heating systems. In addition, the sizing and piping of indirect domestic hot water heaters is covered.

    Prerequisite(s): EST-204  and MAT 078  or MAT 073  (minimum grade C-) or placement at Algebra I or higher on the math placement test.

    Course previously known as: ENGY-411
  
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    EST-206 CCO

    EST-206 - Microprocessor Controls

    2 credits
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with microprocessor-based control systems as used on residential, commercial, and industrial applications. A wide range of control devices is studied, ranging from a mechanical thermostat to a fully programmable digital controller. The laboratory portion of this course will provide the student with hands-on experience in the application of commercial and industrial control systems using microprocessor- based and programmable controllers.

    Prerequisite(s): EST-101 ;

    Corequisite(s): EST 206L  

    Course previously known as: ENGY-350
  
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    EST-206L - Lab: Microprocessor Controls

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of EST 206  .

  
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    EST-207 CCO

    EST-207 - Bldg Management Systems

    3 credits
    This course is an in-depth study of computer- controlled building management systems monitoring all energy-related functions including the heating, air conditioning, lighting, and other environmental systems. The course will include system automation, sensors for monitoring various points in the facility, energy management system software, and remote access to the system. In the laboratory portion of this course, the student will interface the computer operations with the heating/air conditioning systems to provide a totally automated building environment.

    Prerequisite(s): EST-206 ;

    Corequisite(s): EST 207L  

    Course previously known as: ENGY-425
  
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    EST-207L - Lab: Bldg Management Systems

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of EST 207  .

  
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    EST-281 - Energy Systems Co-Op 1

    3-9 credits
    This Cooperative Education course allows students to receive academic credit for off-campus educational work experience related directly to their major field of study.  Students who have completed 15 or more credits and who have achieved a 2.5 cum. QPA or higher are eligible to participate in Cooperative Education experiences. Approval for participation must be obtained from the applicable faculty coordinator and the Director of Cooperative Education.

  
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    EST-282 - Energy Systems Co-Op 2

    3-9 credits
    This Cooperative Education course allows students to receive academic credit for off-campus educational work experience related directly to their major field of study.  Students who have completed 15 or more credits and who have achieved a 2.5 cum. QPA or higher are eligible to participate in Cooperative Education experiences. Approval for participation must be obtained from the applicable faculty coordinator and the Director of Cooperative Education.

  
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    EST-283 - Energy Systems Co-Op 3

    3-9 credits
    This Cooperative Education course allows students to receive academic credit for off-campus educational work experience related directly to their major field of study.  Students who have completed 15 or more credits and who have achieved a 2.5 cum. QPA or higher are eligible to participate in Cooperative Education experiences. Approval for participation must be obtained from the applicable faculty coordinator and the Director of Cooperative Education.


Engineering and Science Transfer

  
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    EGR-101 CCO

    EGR-101 - The Creative Art of Structures

    3 credits


    Learn how to interpret and understand the built environment through technical, visual, and social analysis and critique of bridges, tall buildings, and structural designers.  The Creative Art of Structures is a modern history of structural engineering through the lens of excellence in design.  In a survey of some of the world’s most iconic structures-towers, tall buildings, bridges, and thin concrete shells-structural engineering will be presented as an art form rather than just a technical endeavor. Innovative structures will be studied from engineering, architectural, cultural, and social perspectives.  Structural engineers including bridge engineers Eiffel, Roebling, Robert Maillart, Christian Menn, and Othmar Ammann will be featured, as will tall building engineer Fazlur Khan and thin shell designers Dieste, Candela, and Isler.  Open to all students in any major-no engineering background is necessary.

     

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  and MAT 097   (minimum grade of C) or placement at college-level Math.

  
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    EGR-103 CCO

    EGR-103 - Computer Applications in Engineering

    3 credits
    An introductory course in engineering that utilizes various computer applications to assist in the analysis and communication of the design of an engineering assembly. One third of the course will be devoted to Computer Aided Drafting. Three-dimensional wireframe and solid models will be created. Orthographic projections, auxiliary views, isometric views, dimensioning, and assembly drawings will be discussed. The second third of the course will introduce the spreadsheet as an engineering problem solving tool that facilitates complex calculations, rapid graphical analysis, and numerical modeling. The remaining third of the course will be used to introduce design criteria for assembly, and oral and written presentations. The oral presentation will be facilitated using Power Point software.

    Corequisite(s): EGR 103L  

    Course previously known as: ENGR-203
  
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    EGR-103L - Lab: Computer Applications in Engineering

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of EGR 103  .

  
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    EGR-111 - Intro Materials Science and Engr

    3 credits
    A survey of the materials of engineering and the atomic, molecular, and crystal phenomena responsible for their properties. The unifying theme is that the structures of materials determine their properties. Materials considered include alloys, semiconductors, polymers, and ceramics. Homework and tests are designed to build technical vocabulary and facility with tabulated and graphics data in solving basic materials analysis and design problems.

    Prerequisite(s): CHM-111 /CHM 111L  and MAT 131  

    Corequisite(s): PHY 231 /PHY 231L  

    Course previously known as: ENGR-330
  
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    EGR-121 - Mechanics 1

    3 credits
    This is the first mechanics course for engineering majors. It is a vector approach to the solution of equilibrium problems for particles, rigid bodies, and multi-membered structures (frames, machines, and trusses). In order to broaden the scope of problems available for analysis, the student is introduced to the study of friction forces and centroids. Also, for preparation for future mechanics courses, the topics of moment of inertia and shear and bending moments are introduced.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-131  and PHY-231 ;

    Course previously known as: ENGR-310
  
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    EGR-122 - Mechanics 2

    3 credits
    Vector calculus is developed and applied to the solution of kinematic problems involving particles and rigid bodies. Different coordinate systems are utilized and kinetics analysis is applied using force balances, the impulse momentum principle, and the work energy theorem.

    Prerequisite(s): EGR-121 ;

    Course previously known as: ENGR-410
  
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    EGR-211 CCO

    EGR-211 - Probability and Statistics for Engineers

    3 credits
    This course will equip an engineering student with the knowledge needed to understand the interaction of variables in engineering design such as material failures, poor quality, missed schedules, and poor engineering. Topics to be covered include descriptive statistics measure of location and variability, discrete random variables, joint probability covariance and correlation, point estimate, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and linear regression.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-132 ;

    Course previously known as: ENGR-411
  
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    EGR-219 - Mechanics of Materials

    3 credits
    Engineering applications of the principles of solid mechanics. Uniaxial and torsional problems are discussed followed by team deflections. Plane stress and strain are then presented, followed by stability problems in column design.

    Prerequisite(s): EGR-121  and MAT-132 ;

    Corequisite(s): EGR 219L  recommended.

    Course previously known as: ENGR-335
  
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    EGR-219L

    EGR-219L - Lab: Mechanics of Materials

    1 credits


    This course is the laboratory component of EGR 219 .  Established material testing techniques that provide physical observations to complement and reinforce concepts learned in EGR 219 .  Data collection, measurement, and experimental techniques to determine mechanical properties and stresses, strains, and deformations for various materials used in civil engineering.  Introduction to computer modeling of structural members.  Topics include mechanical properties of metals and concrete; concrete constitutent testing and mix design; concrete casting and hardened concrete testing; beam and column behavior; and analysis of structural members using modeling software.

     

    Corequisite(s): EGR 219 .

  
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    EGR-221 CCO

    EGR-221 - Circuit Analysis 1

    3 credits
    Mathematical models will be developed to describe the behavior of practical voltage and current sources and resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers (op-amps). Techniques for the analysis of voltage, current and power relationships among these devices interconnected in circuits will be practiced. Analysis techniques will include Kirchoff’s Laws, Loop and Nodal Analysis, the Superposition Theorem and Thevenin’s and Norton’s Theorems. DC applications (constant in time) as well as AC applications (varying sinusoidally with time) will be considered. Treatment of AC applications will include an introduction to phasor analysis and the concept of complex frequency.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-132  and PHY-231 ;

    Corequisite(s): EGR 225  

    Course previously known as: ENGR-320
  
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    EGR-222 CCO

    EGR-222 - Circuit Analysis 2

    3 credits
    A continuation of EGR-221 , this course develops mathematical tools for the analysis of circuits consisting of resistors, inductors and capacitors driven by voltage and current sources which are periodic functions of time. Topics covered include complex power, poles and zeros in the complex frequency domain, two-port transfer functions, forced and natural response, resonance, Fourier series and the LaPlace transform.

    Prerequisite(s): EGR-221 ;

    Corequisite(s): EGR 226  

    Course previously known as: ENGR-420
  
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    EGR-225 - Electrical Engineering Lab 1

    1 credits
    This course offers laboratory experiments that test the theoretical analysis techniques presented in EGR 221  . These experiments involve measurement of voltage and current signals in circuits consisting of resistors, inductors and capacitors. Operational amplifiers (op amps) are also investigated. Laboratory workstations are equipped with current-controlled and voltage-controlled power supplies, signal generators, digital multimeters, oscilloscopes and breadboards for interconnecting discrete devices. Computer Software will be introduced as a tool of analysis. A formal written report is required for each experiment.

    Corequisite(s): EGR-221  

    Course previously known as: ENGR-324
  
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    EGR-226 - Electronic Engineering Lab 2

    1 credits
    This course offers laboratory experiments that test the theoretical analysis techniques presented in EGR-222 . Circuits consisting of resistors, inductors and capacitors connected to signal generators will be investigated by measuring voltages, currents and impedances. Measurements will be made with AC meters and with oscilloscopes in the time domain and in the frequency domain. Students will investigate frequency response, resonance and amplification. Experiments will also investigate the characteristics of diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers driven by time-varying signals. The P-Spice computer program will be used as a tool of analysis. A formal written report on each experiment is required.

    Corequisite(s): EGR-222  

    Course previously known as: ENGR-427
  
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    EGR-229 CCO

    EGR-229 - Engineering Thermodynamics 1

    3 credits
    A classical presentation of thermodynamics including the first and second laws and their application to batch and flow processes. Ideal gas, real gas, graphical, and tabular relationships among the physical properties of substances which are affected by energy transformations including pressure, temperature, volume, internal energy, enthalpy, and entropy. Heat engines, heat pumps, and carnot cycles.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-132 , PHY-231  and CHM-111 ;

    Course previously known as: ENGR-350
  
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    EGR-230 CCO

    EGR-230 - Engineering Thermodynamic Computational Lab

    1 credits
    This computational laboratory introduces the latest software, and discusses the various computational techniques necessary to permit students to solve all of their thermodynamic and related engineering problems with a computer. Analytical, graphical, and numerical methods are discussed. Students will take this course concurrently with EGR-229 . Engineering Thermodynamics, so that all of their homework will be submitted using the computer. A final capstone project will be required in this course.

    Corequisite(s): EGR-229  

    Course previously known as: ENGR-351
  
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    EGR-231 CCO

    EGR-231 - Introduction to Chemical Engineering

    3 credits
    An introduction to the material and energy balances commonly applied to processes in the chemical, petroleum and environmental fields. Also included is a study of the pressure volume temperature relationship of gases and a brief introduction to selected thermodynamic properties of solids, liquids, and gases. Computer solutions are utilized in selected problems.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-132 , CHM-112  and EGR-103 ;

    Course previously known as: ENGR-340
  
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    EGR-232 CCO

    EGR-232 - Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 1

    3 credits
    An introductory course dealing with the fundamental concepts and laws of thermodynamics and of the thermodynamic properties of materials. The major emphasis is on chemical systems.

    Prerequisite(s): EGR-231 ;

    Course previously known as: ENGR-440

Finance

  
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    FIN-101 CCO

    FIN-101 - Introduction to Finance

    3 credits
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with the manner in which the financial system functions and with the techniques used to reach financial decisions. Major topics to be studied include the nature of money and financial institutions, central banking, securities markets, managing and financing of organizational assets. Special emphasis is given to financial decision-making.

    Prerequisite(s): DRG-092  and MAT-087  (minimum grade of C-) or placement at a higher level.

    Corequisite(s): ACC-101  

    Course previously known as: FINC-110
  
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    FIN-250 CCO

    FIN-250 - Investments

    3 credits
    This is a beginning course in investment management with special emphasis on the principles governing individual and institutional investment programs. Topics covered include the mechanics of investment, valuation tools, securities analysis and portfolio management.

    Prerequisite(s): FIN-101 ;

    Course previously known as: FINC-410
  
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    FIN-280 - Business Finance Internship 1

    3-9 credits
    This Cooperative Education course allows students to receive academic credit for off-campus educational work experience related directly to their major field of study.  Students who have completed 15 or more credits and who have achieved a 2.5 cum. QPA or higher are eligible to participate in Cooperative Education experiences. Approval for participation must be obtained from the applicable faculty coordinator and the Director of Cooperative Education.

  
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    FIN-281 - Business Finance Co-Op 1

    3-9 credits
    This Cooperative Education course allows students to receive academic credit for off-campus educational work experience related directly to their major field of study.  Students who have completed 15 or more credits and who have achieved a 2.5 cum. QPA or higher are eligible to participate in Cooperative Education experiences. Approval for participation must be obtained from the applicable faculty coordinator and the Director of Cooperative Education.


Fire Protection/Science

  
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    FST-101 - Fire Protection & Fire Prevention

    4 credits
    An introduction to fire science, with an emphasis on protection. This course includes a historical survey of fire services, principles of flame and smoke spread, flammable liquids, gases, explosions, residential and industrial hazards. It also provides an overview of residential and commercial fire safety inspections, safety demonstrations, extinguishing techniques, and public and news media relations.

    Course previously known as: FIRE-125
  
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    FST-110 - Bldg Construction

    3 credits
    An exploration of building construction and design with emphasis focused on fire protection concerns, review of statutory and suggested guidelines, local, state, and national.

    Prerequisite(s): FST-101  

    Course previously known as: FIRE-210
  
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    FST-120 - Organization and Management Of Fire Departments

    3 credits
    An exploration of organizational principles with emphasis on fire department organization; a study of the history, types, methods, and principles of fire department organization, both formal and informal, line and staff. Emphasis is placed on supervisory responsibilities and functions.

    Course previously known as: FIRE-220
  
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    FST-130 - Fire Protection Systems

    3 credits
    The detection and extinguishing systems of both automatic and manual types are studied, including sprinkler and standpipe systems, inert gases, foam and dry chemicals, temperature and smoke responsive devices, and alarm, and signaling systems. Demonstration will illustrate and supplement the class work. Required for graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): FST-101 ;

    Course previously known as: FIRE-330
  
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    FST-131 - Advanced Protection Systems

    3 credits
    This course is a continuation of FST-130  and it is presented for those people interested in advanced fire control systems. Sprinkler systems will be given a great amount of attention in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): FST-130  

    Course previously known as: FIRE-430
  
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    FST-140 - Fire Officership

    3 credits
    Fire department company officers play an important role in the coordination of the fire department’s goals and objectives. In most instances, they are the people who ensure that action is taken to accomplish day-to-day tasks. This course focuses on the basic principles of fire department organization, leadership principles, working relationships, and personnel management. For the firefighter aspiring to become a company officer, or for a company officer wishing to improve management skills, this course will help develop and improve the necessary skills to effectively manage the Fire Company.

    Prerequisite(s): FST-101  

    Course previously known as: FIRE-340
  
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    FST-210 - Fire Hydraulics and Equipment

    3 credits
    This course covers incompressible fluids, including fluid properties, principles of fluid status, fluid flow system principles, pipe friction and heat loss, flow measurements, pumps, and other hydraulic devices and machinery. Applications are related to fire protection systems such as sprinklers, standpipes, hoses, nozzles, pumpers, and water supply systems. Demonstrations will illustrate and supplement the principles developed in class. Required for graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-100  

    Course previously known as: FIRE-310
  
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    FST-220 - Fire Causes and Detection

    3 credits
    This course concerns the history development and philosophy of fire investigation and detection. Including inspection techniques, gathering evidence and development of technical reports, fundamentals of arson investigation, processing of criminal evidence and criminal procedures related to various state and local statutes.

    Prerequisite(s): FST-101 ;

    Course previously known as: FIRE-420
  
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    FST-230 - Hazardous Materials

    3 credits
    This course includes a review of basic chemistry, storage and handling of hazardous materials, laws, standards and fire fighting practices within extreme fire hazard areas. Demonstrations will illustrate and supplement the class work. Required for graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): CHM-101 ;

    Course previously known as: FIRE-410

French

  
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    FRE-101 CCO

    FRE-101 - Elementary French 1

    3 credits
    This is an introductory course for students with little or no previous background in French. Students are introduced to the French alphabet, diacritical marks, and phonics system. Basic grammar, vocabulary building, reading comprehension, and writing are also introduced. Basic listening comprehension skills and conversational skills are developed. The class is conducted in French as much as possible.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement at ENG-101  or its equivalent or permission of instructor.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Humanities and Fine Arts requirements.

    Course previously known as: FREN-124
  
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    FRE-102 CCO

    FRE-102 - Elementary French 2

    3 credits
    This course is a continuation of FRE-101 . Students build on grammar skills i.e. present, past, and future tenses of verbs, expand vocabulary, reading comprehension and writing paragraphs and short compositions. Short stories and poetry are covered in class. Students expand their listening and speaking skills. The class in conducted mostly in French.

    Prerequisite(s): FRE-101 

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Humanities and Fine Arts requirements.

    Course previously known as: FREN-224
  
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    FRE-201 CCO

    FRE-201 - Intermediate French 1

    3 credits
    This course is designed to maintain and improve French language skills for those with a basic knowledge of the language. Students will continue to progress in grammar, pronunciation, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students will also continue to study the culture and customs of people in Francophone countries. The class is conducted mostly in French.

    Prerequisite(s): FRE-102  (grade of C or higher), two years of high school French or permission of instructor.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Humanities and Fine Arts requirements.

    Course previously known as: FREN-324
  
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    FRE-202 CCO

    FRE-202 - Intermediate French 2

    3 credits
    This course is a continuation of FRN-201. Emphasis is placed on oral and written expression of the language. A variety of modern reading selections representing writers from Francophone regions worldwide will be assigned and discussed in class during the semester. Review of grammar from previous semesters and introduction to some new grammar are presented. Classes are conducted in French.

    Prerequisite(s): FRE-201 

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Humanities and Fine Arts requirements.

    Course previously known as: FREN-424

Graphic Communications and Photography

  
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    GAT-122 CCO

    GAT-122 - Digital Workflow

    2 credits
    This lecture and lab course presents the various techniques, both traditional and electronic, of prepress preparation for printing. The lecture portion of the course will cover the specific requirements of image reproduction, including an overview of equipment materials, software, and technique. The process of laying out a print job in the most efficient and economical configuration will be emphasized. In the lab portion, students will be introduced to traditional pre-press techniques, including contacting, camera work, and film image assembly. Precision, calibration, and quality evaluation will be stressed.

    Corequisite(s): GAT 122L  

    Course previously known as: GRPH-122
  
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    GAT-122L - Lab: Digital Workflow

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of GAT 122  .

  
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    GAT-125 CCO

    GAT-125 - Typography and Layout Design

    2 credits
    Typography & Layout Design is a course designed to introduce students to the basic elements of type, design, and page layout. The lectures will cover the history, specification, and aesthetics of type, both as text and design elements. The fundamentals of page layout will be covered with a focus on the effective visual presentation of type and images. In the labs, students will begin with the basics of designing & producing traditional art work and proceed to digital design and layout using current software. An emphasis on clean, functional design will be stressed.

    Corequisite(s): GAT 125L  

    Course previously known as: GRPH-125
  
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    GAT-125L - Lab: Typography and Layout Design

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of GAT 125  .

  
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    GAT-131 CCO

    GAT-131 - Graphic Communications

    2 credits
    Graphic Communications is comprehensive overview of the printing industry. This course will introduce the students to the world of contemporary printing through a series of lectures. A study of printing history, an examination of how various technologies evolved; and a look at present-day printing processes will provide the student with a foundation for all other courses offered in Graphic Communications Department. Lab portion of graphic communications course will cover the standard graphic software and print media equipment. Students will do variety projects dealing with print media.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-078  

    Corequisite(s): GAT-131L  

    Course previously known as: GRPH-131
  
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    GAT-135 CCO

    GAT-135 - Advertising Agency Management

    3 credits
    In this course, the student will learn the basic principles for setting up and managing a full-service advertising agency. The primary elements of the course will include the purpose of the five types of ad agencies and their unique characteristics and structure. The course will incorporate the basic business models used in the day-to-day operation of an agency including the managerial structure for both the business and creative aspects. Students will learn how marketing research interfaces with advertising, classification of advertising, and the various media available to achieve the goals of an integrated advertising campaign. Also covered will be media research, selection, and planning, media buying, budgeting, proposal development and presentation.

    Prerequisite(s): MKT 101  , GAT 263  , GAT 162   and GAT 125  

  
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    GAT-150 CCO

    GAT-150 - Introduction to Professional Photography

    2 credits
    An introduction to photography using computer-based technologies, as well as learning about the history and aesthetics of photography. The student will learn how to use professional photographic and studio lighting equipment. In addition, the student will use professional software for image processing and output (both black and white and color). There will be many demonstrations covering a wide variety of photographic techniques. Students are given picture-taking assignments to develop their composition and perspective skills, and to promote creativity. Critiques, both private and public, are held to provide students feedback regarding their work.

    Corequisite(s): GAT-150L  , GAT-151  

    Course previously known as: GRPH-180
  
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    GAT-150L - Lab: Introduction to Professional Photography

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of GAT-150  .

    Corequisite(s): GAT-150  

  
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    GAT-151 CCO

    GAT-151 - Digital Photography/Studio Module

    2 credits
    Digital Photography Studio Module is an introductory digital photography course instructing students on the safe and proper operation of the department’s digital cameras, studio lighting equipment, and printers. There will be many hands-on, on-site demonstrations that will give students experience that will prepare them for higher level digital photography courses.

    Corequisite(s): GAT-150  

    Course previously known as: GRPH-181
  
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    GAT-152 CCO

    GAT-152 - Advanced Professional Photography

    2 credits
    This is an advanced photography course using computer-based technologies. The student will use professional photographic and studio lighting equipment in the production of high quality photographic images. In addition, the student will learn advanced software techniques for image processing and the manipulation of digital images. There will be many demonstrations covering a wide variety of professional photographic techniques, including portrait, product, and macro photography. The students will also learn the basics of professional wedding photography. Students are given picture-taking assignments to hone their composition and perspective skills. Critiques are held to provide the student feedback regarding his/her work. Professional mounting and presentation techniques shall also be demonstrated.

    Prerequisite(s): GAT-150 ;

    Corequisite(s): GAT 152L  

    Course previously known as: GRPH-280
  
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    GAT-152L - Lab: Advanced Professional Photography

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of GAT-152  .

    Corequisite(s): GAT-152  

  
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    GAT-155 CCO

    GAT-155 - Macintosh Operating Systems

    2 credits
    Since the Apple Macintosh computer has become a staple “tool” for electronic prepress, learning proper operating procedures and maintenance are essential for all Graphic Arts Technology students. This hands-on lecture course explores system software basics through custom configuration, including all five Macintosh microprocessor generations, disk management, files & folders, menus & hierarchies, System & Finder, loading & updating software, Mac OS X applications & utilities, font usage, file formats, file sharing & networking, troubleshooting, connecting peripherals & printing, and third party utilities used in today’s digital industry. Students’ final project will be a multimedia presentation using Apple software. Note: This course & lab are web-assisted.

    Prerequisite(s): GAT-125 , GAT 125L , or permission of instructor

    Corequisite(s): GAT 155L  

    Course previously known as: GRPH-455
 

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