Aug 11, 2022  
2017-18 Academic Catalog 
    
2017-18 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Physics

  
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    PHY-104L - Lab: Survey of Astronomy

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 104  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

  
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    PHY-105 CCO

    PHY-105 - Physical Science 1

    3 credits
    This is a course for non-science majors, particularly future K-12 teachers, drawing from a broad base of topics in physical science about the study of matter and energy. Science and technology are the driving forces of change in our world today. This course introduces basic concepts of physics, covering forces, optics, temperature, heat, simple harmonic motion, the electromagnetic spectrum, and electricity. A qualitative / descriptive approach to natural phenomena is discussed utilizing basic math skills. The intent is to provide a student with a broad basis touching on physics, chemistry, and some life science. Computer simulations and internet research are used to probe the laws of physics. This course is primarily intended to fulfill a laboratory science requirement for General Studies students, and, although not recommended, may in some cases be used as a transferable science course by Liberal Arts transfer students. Scientific Calculator required.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT 089  , MAT-083  or MAT-087  (minimum grade C-) and placement in DRG-092  and DWT-099  or above.

    Corequisite(s): PHY 105L  

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

    Course previously known as: PHYS-125
  
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    PHY-105L - Lab: Physical Science 1

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 105  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

  
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    PHY-116 CCO

    PHY-116 - Physics of Green Energy

    3 credits
    This is a physical science laboratory course for non-science majors in the study of alternative and renewable energy sources. Conservation of energy and energy efficiency are contemporary global topics. The student will gain broad practical knowledge of alternative energy production currently in use and alternative and renewable energy sources for use in tomorrow’s zero-emissions world. Students will be able to make better professional and personal decisions regarding the issues of energy and conservation. Areas of study will emphasize an overview about the technology of alternative energy devices such as: solar, wind, fuel cells, ocean wave power, and other forms of renewable “green” and sustainable electrical energy production. Also addressed are traditional conventional electrical energy sources such as: batteries, traditional electric generators, steam and gas turbines and nuclear power stations.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-083 , MAT 089  or MAT-087  (C- or better) or placement at college level on math placement test and placement in DRG-092  and DWT-099 .

    Corequisite(s): PHY 116L  

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

    Course previously known as: PHYS-160
  
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    PHY-116L - Lab: Physics of Green Energy

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 116  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

  
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    PHY-118 CCO

    PHY-118 - Introduction to Light and Lasers

    3 credits
    This course will introduce students to the principles and applications of light and lasers. Students will learn about the electromagnetic spectrum, how lenses and mirrors form images, how basic optical instruments such as microscopes and telescopes work, how a laser functions, and how prisms and diffraction gratings function are used in spectroscopy. Lasers and precision measurement, polarizers, LCDs, hair-thin strands of glass fiber in telecommunications systems, holograms will be discussed. Examples will be drawn from precision manufacturing, environmental science, homeland security and defense, telecommunications, and entertainment. Laboratory activities and demonstrations will be used extensively to supplement classroom discussions and bridge from theory to practical applications. All laboratory experiments will be conducted in the Laser-Electro-Optics Technology department labs. A basic scientific calculator (e.g., Casio FX-260 or TI-30XA) is required. This is a transferable science course for non-science majors. Honors component with permission of instructor. Some programs require a grade of C or better. Open to all students. Offered both semesters.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-124  completion with a C- or better and placement in ENG-101 .

    Corequisite(s): PHY 118L  

    Course previously known as: PHYS-180
  
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    PHY-118L - Lab: Introduction to Light and Lasers

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 118  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

  
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    PHY-206 CCO

    PHY-206 - Optics and Image Recording

    3 credits
    This course explores capturing images with the action of light. It is a transferable laboratory-science course for non-science majors, which provides students with a theoretical foundation and laboratory experience with the properties of light and the techniques of image recording. Topics include the theories and processes involved in recording images on photosensitive surfaces, followed by examining the materials, and measuring the image quality. Among the sub-topics covered are light, color, lenses, photographic history, densitometry, and digital imaging. Includes a three hour laboratory. Scientific Calculator required. Web assisted. There is no honors component. Offered Fall semester. Required by some programs.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement at ENG-101  and MAT-083 , MAT 089  or MAT-087  with a minimum grade of C-.

    Corequisite(s): PHY 206L  

    Course previously known as: PHYS-256
  
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    PHY-206L - Lab: Optics and Image Recording

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 206  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

  
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    PHY-213 CCO

    PHY-213 - Radiologic Physics 1

    3 credits
    Topics covered are: basic mechanics, mass, force, work, momentum, electrostatics leading to fundamentals of electronics to produce photons. Laboratory exercises are related the specific topics and require graphing and writing. Special topics covered are: the nature of the photon, ionizing photons, the photoelectric effect, the Compton Effect, pair production and the secondary radiation produced by the primary effects. Attenuation characteristics and spectra are discussed. Use of software program using spread sheet required. Scientific Calculator required. Honors component with permission of instructor.  This course is specifically designed to meet the physics requirement for students in the Diagnostic Medical Imaging program.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-124  and placement in ENG-101  ( minimum grade C- ).

    Corequisite(s): PHY 213L  

    Course previously known as: PHYS-300
  
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    PHY-213L - Lab: Radiologic Physics 1

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 213  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

  
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    PHY-221 CCO

    PHY-221 - Physics 1

    3 credits
    A non-calculus, introductory physics course, also called “mechanics”. Topics include kinematics, Newton’s Laws of Motion, work and energy, rotational motion, static equilibrium, conservation of linear and angular momentum. Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation, oscillatory and wave motion will be discussed. Includes a three-hour laboratory. Honors component with permission of instructor. The calculus based physics course equivalent in topic coverage is PHY-231 .

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-124  with a minimum grade of C- and placement at ENG-101 .

    Corequisite(s): PHY 221L  

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

    Course previously known as: PHYS-130
  
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    PHY-221L - Lab: Physics 1

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 221  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

  
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    PHY-222 CCO

    PHY-222 - Physics 2

    3 credits
    A non-calculus, introductory physics course, also called “electricity and magnetism.” It is offered as a continuation of PHY-221 . Topics include electrostatics, electronics, circuit analysis, alternating current, magnetism. Heat, sound, optics, and temperature will be discussed. Includes a three-hour laboratory. Honors component with permission of instructor. The calculus based physics course equivalent in topic coverage is PHY-232 .

    Prerequisite(s): PHY-221  (minimum grade of C-) and placement at college-level English.

    Corequisite(s): PHY 222L  

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

    Course previously known as: PHYS-230
  
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    PHY-222L - Lab: Physics 2

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 222  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

  
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    PHY-231 CCO

    PHY-231 - Classical Physics 1

    3 credits
    A calculus-based, rigorous physics course for engineering and science transfer majors, also called “Newtonian Mechanics”. It is the first of a required two-semester sequence [PHY-232 ] for engineering transfer students. Topics include kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion and conservation laws, applied to single particles, sets of particles and rigid bodies. Newton’s law of universal gravitation and harmonic motion will be discussed. Includes a three-hour laboratory and a one-hour recitation each week. Honors component with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT-131  (minimum grade of C-) and placement at college-level English.

    Corequisite(s): PHY 231L   and MAT-132  

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

    Course previously known as: PHYS-132
  
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    PHY-231L - Lab: Classical Physics 1

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 231  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

  
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    PHY-232 CCO

    PHY-232 - Classical Physics 2

    3 credits
    A calculus-based, rigorous physics course for engineering and science transfer majors, also called “Electricity and Magnetism”. It is the second of a required two-semester sequence [PHY-231 ] for engineering transfer students. Topics include electrostatics, electric and magnetic fields, their interaction with charged particles, and laws of induction. Voltage, current and circuit analysis will be discussed. Includes a three-hour laboratory and a one-hour recitation each week. Honors component with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY-231  and MAT-132  (minimum grade of C-) and placement at college-level English.

    Corequisite(s): PHY 232L   and MAT-233  

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

    Course previously known as: PHYS-232
  
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    PHY-232L - Lab: Classical Physics 2

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 232  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.

  
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    PHY-233 CCO

    PHY-233 - Modern Physics 3

    3 credits
    A calculus-based, rigorous physics elective for engineering and science transfer majors. It is the optional continuation of a required two-semester sequence [PHY 231  , PHY 232  ] for engineering transfer students. Topics include geometric and wave optics, quantum theory and special relativity. Fundamentals of nuclear and particle physics will be discussed. Includes a three-hour laboratory and a one-hour recitation each week. Honors component with permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY-231  with a grade of C-or better and placement at ENG-101 .

    Corequisite(s): PHY 233L  , MAT 233 , and PHY-232  (can be taken simultaneously with permission of instructor)

    Course previously known as: PHYS-332
  
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    PHY-233L - Lab: Modern Physics 3

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of PHY 233  .

    Corequisite(s): PHY 233  .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Natural or Physical Science requirements.


Political Science

  
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    PSC-101 CCO

    PSC-101 - American Government and Politics 1

    3 credits
    An analysis of the way in which politics and political institutions work in American society. The major problems of American democracy are explored with their political, social and economic implications. Also explored are constitutional rights and freedoms, the federal power structure and changing governmental institutions.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: PSCI-100
  
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    PSC-110 - Political Theory 1: From Plato to Hobbes

    3 credits
    This course is a survey and comparative analysis of the political writings of various thinkers from classical antiquity to the 1600s. The course will also examine key concepts of normative political theory, such as power, ideology, and the state, and their relationship to the perennial problems of the social order.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: PSCI-300

Psychology

  
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    PSY-101 CCO

    PSY-101 - General Psychology

    3 credits
    This introductory course identifies those scientific methods used to study human behavior. Discussion centers around the contribution of heredity, environment, learning, perception, motivation and emotion in shaping our individual personalities. Honors component available.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: PSYC-100
  
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    PSY-102 CCO

    PSY-102 - Human Relations

    3 credits
    This is a course designed to build a strong self image. Each student has an opportunity to understand that he/she is a functioning human being in the twentieth century and that this is not a task to be taken lightly. He/she will realize that we are all similar in many ways and that we are also different. This course will help the student establish a philosophy of life that will be very helpful in his/her communications and awareness of the future.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: PSYC-109
  
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    PSY-200 CCO

    PSY-200 - Child Psychology

    3 credits
    This advanced course examines the major influences on a child’s physical, cognitive and social development from conception through early childhood. Information is presented in chronological order to give an integrated view of the child at each major phase of development. An examination of the basic theories and contemporary research suggest some answers for more effective parenting.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY-101  ( minimum grade D- ).

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: PSYC-305
  
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    PSY-210 CCO

    PSY-210 - Lifespan Human Growth and Development

    3 credits
    This course will emphasize the cognitive, biological, psychosocial, sexual, cultural and moral development of the individual from conception through old age. The theories of Freud, Erikson, Piaget, Kohlberg, Kubler-Ross and other prominent psychologists will be applied to specific problems in the developmental process.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY-101 

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: PSYC-325
  
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    PSY-215 CCO

    PSY-215 - Theories of Personality

    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to psychological theory and research on the concept of personality It examines the prominent paradigms in personality theory: psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic and trait theory. Particular emphasis is placed on the determinants and development of personality and current thought regarding the interplay of biological and environmental influences.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY-101  ( minimum grade D- ).

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: PSYC-335
  
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    PSY-220 CCO

    PSY-220 - Adolescent Psychology

    3 credits
    This advanced cause examines the major influences on a person’s physical, cognitive and social development from childhood through adolescence. An examination of the basic theories and contemporary research is presented for each major phase in order to give an integrated view of development in humans during this time of their lives.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY-101  ( minimum grade D- ).

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: PSYC-350
  
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    PSY-225 CCO

    PSY-225 - Cognitive Psychology: Learning & Memory

    3 credits
    How do we remember our experiences, learn new information, make decisions, solve problems, and perceive the world around us? What are attention, emotion, and creativity? And what happens when these cognitive processes break down? Cognitive Psychology: Learning & Memory, explores these processes of thought and mind and how we research them. Students will learn theories, methods, and concepts of cognitive psychology and apply them to everyday life including their own learning.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 101  

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

  
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    PSY-230 CCO

    PSY-230 - Principles of Normal/Abnormal Behavior

    3 credits
    A general introduction into the origin, development degrees of mental disorganization and the methods of coping with psychological dysfunction. Inquiry will also be made into the theoretical and applied approaches of several of the major schools of thought with regards to helping services.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY-101 

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: PSYC-400
  
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    PSY-240 CCO

    PSY-240 - Intro to Forensic Psychology

    3 credits
    This course will provide students with basic information about the various forensic activities utilized within the legal system and their relationship to psychology. Some of the forensic psychology tools may include: competency evaluations, assessment of violent behavior and dangerousness, court testimony, police psychology, and consulting with criminal, juvenile and civil courts. The psychology of criminal behaviors will be presented. Students will obtain introductory information about the numerous roles of professionals in this field and will develop basic knowledge and skills which will prepare them to continue with specialized training in this area.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY-101  ( minimum grade D- )

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: PSYC-410
  
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    PSY-245 CCO

    PSY-245 - Research Methodology

    3 credits
    In this course, students will be introduced to the basics of research terminology and methodology. Students will be led through the steps of conducting a scientifically based research project. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the scientific method. Topics discussed will include formulating hypotheses, testing methodology, and evaluating of the data in an objective ethical manner.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG-101  , MAT-115  , and PSY-101   or SOC-101  

  
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    PSY-260 CCO

    PSY-260 - Field Practicum

    3 credits
    Field Practicum includes both the 90 hours of Social Work Practicum and the weekly practicum seminar. The social work practicum provides social work students with an opportunity to demonstrate, practice, and learn social work skills, examine and test their understanding of social work values, apply and integrate classroom learning, acquire new knowledge about social work practice in a variety of substantive areas and practice settings, and develop an identity as a professional social worker. Social work students generally spend an average of seven hours per week in the field. In addition to the time spent in the field setting, practicum students also participate in a weekly integrative seminar. The seminar provides students with an opportunity to discuss and compare practicum experiences, learn from and teach each other, examine personal values and ethical issues in social work practice, and further integrate knowledge and experience through structured assignments and activities.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  PSY 101  

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.


Radiography

  
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    RDG-101 - Introduction to Clinical Practice

    2 credits
    This introductory course will deal with the essentials for patient/technologist interaction. The relationship between clinical education and the theory component of the R.T. curriculum as well as defining the clinical competency evaluation system are covered. Students will learn definition of terms, titles of organizations, and abbreviation/phrases used in a radiography department. They will also discuss personal obligations, what is meant by professional confidentiality and effective communication techniques. The nature of ionizing radiation and its biological effect on the human, risk versus benefit, radiation detection equipment, and instrumentation. The class will also discuss the NCR and Commonwealth of Massachusetts rules and regulations relating to protection and monitoring of personnel.

    Course previously known as: RADG-116
  
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    RDG-110 CCO

    RDG-110 - Equipment Operation and Maintenance

    1 credits
    Sequential to  , an in-depth examination of the equipment used in radiography, starting with the x-ray tube and the rectifying circuit, tube ratings, and the cooling charts for multiple exposures, automatic exposure control, image intensification, stereography, and tomography. Problem solving for different grids is covered.

    Corequisite(s): RDG 110L  

    Course previously known as: RADG-212
  
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    RDG-110L - Lab: Equipment Operation and Maintenance

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of RDG 110  .

  
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    RDG-111 CCO

    RDG-111 - Radiographic Positioning 1

    3 credits
    This course provides the basis for performing anatomic positioning. Anatomic positioning is the “art” of radiography. The final product, the radiograph, is dependent upon proper anatomic positioning, as well as the proper technical factors. The ultimate purpose of all positioning is to visualize specific parts of the body, free from superimposition of anatomic structures, and pathology. This course will include development of psychomotor skills in the application of ionizing radiation to produce diagnostic radiographs of the appendicular skeleton. The laboratory section of this course affords time for the student to demonstrate and practice the radiographic positions. The lab sessions simulate conditions or situations with patients in the radiology department.

    Prerequisite(s): MAT 099 , MAT 093 , or MAT 097  (C- or better) or placement at college-level on math placement test.

    Corequisite(s): RDG 111L  

    Course previously known as: RADG-111
  
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    RDG-111L - Lab: Radiographic Positioning 1

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of RDG 111  .

  
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    RDG-112 CCO

    RDG-112 - Radiographic Positioning 2

    3 credits
    This course is a continuation of RDG-111 - Radiographic Positioning 1 . It deals with the anatomic positioning of the spine, the ribs and pathology. Also, assisting the Radiologist in contrast instillation during exams of the urinary system, gastrointestinal, and bilary tracts. The lab section of this course affords time for the student to demonstrate and practice the radiographic positions. The lab sessions simulate conditions or situations with patients in the radiology department.

    Prerequisite(s): RDG 111 RDG 111L BIO 231  and BIO 231L .

    Corequisite(s): RDG 112L  

    Course previously known as: RADG-211
  
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    RDG-112L - Lab: Radiographic Positioning 2

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of RDG 112  .

  
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    RDG-121 CCO

    RDG-121 - Clinical Practicum 1

    2 credits
    These course provide a structured clinical experience to assist the student in the application of didactic and laboratory practice in clinical settings, under the supervision of registered technologists. This experience includes an examination of the student’s competence, and a continuing evaluation of his professionalism. Clinical Orientation 1 and 2 are required prior to Clinical Practicum 1 and 4, respectively. Successful completion of each course is required to progress to the next practicum.

    Prerequisite(s): RDG-101 ;

    Course previously known as: RADG-213
  
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    RDG-122 - Clinical Practicum 2 (12 Weeks)

    4 credits
    This course requires students to spend five clinical days a week in a radiology department where students will perform routine as well as some complex examinations under the direct supervision of a registered radiographer and a clinical instructor. Procedures performed are evaluated on the basis of a competency-based clinical education system. This experience includes an examination of the student’s competence, critical thinking and a continuing evaluation of his/her professionalism. Clinical Practicum 1 and Positioning 1 & 2 are required prior to Summer Clinical Practicum and Clinical Practicum 4, respectively. Success completion of each course is required to progress to the next practicum.

    Prerequisite(s): RDG-112  RDG-121 ;

    Course previously known as: RADG-215
  
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    RDG-131 CCO

    RDG-131 - Image Production and Evaluation

    1 credits
    An understanding of how images in radiography are recorded is necessary as a first step in obtaining the best radiograph for medical diagnosis. This introductory course covers these essentials: film, video, laser and computer images, manual and automatic processing, intensifying screens, primary exposure factors, and mathematical principles that apply to image quality. These topics include grids, beam restricting devices, density contrast, detail, geometric and other types of distortion, and ways to reduce dose to the patient. Restricted to Radiologic Technology - DMIR.AS  students.

    Corequisite(s): RDG 131L  

    Course previously known as: RADG-112
  
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    RDG-131L - Lab: Image Production and Evaluation

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of RDG 131  .

  
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    RDG-211 - Radiographic Positioning 3

    2 credits
    This course is a continuation of RDG-112 - Radiographic Positioning 2 . It deals with the positioning of the cranium and special views (projections) of the anatomic structures in RDG-111  and RDG-112 . The major emphasis will be placed on the various positions of the cranium, and pathology.

    Corequisite(s): RDG 211L  

    Course previously known as: RADG-314
  
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    RDG-211L - Lab: Radiographic Positioning 3

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of RDG 211  .

  
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    RDG-221 - Clinical Practicum 3

    3 credits
    The clinical, bedside, and laboratory application of respiratory care is presented, utilizing the facilities of affiliated clinical sites and College laboratory under supervision of hospital respiratory care practitioners, physicians, and College faculty. Clinical affiliation is designed to expose students to an environment in which they can practice respiratory care.

    Prerequisite(s): RDG 122  

    Course previously known as: RADG-313
  
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    RDG-222 - Clinical Practicum 4

    3 credits
    The clinical, bedside, and laboratory application of respiratory care is presented, utilizing the facilities of affiliated clinical sites and College laboratory under supervision of hospital respiratory care practitioners, physicians, and College faculty. Clinical affiliation is designed to expose students to an environment in which they can practice respiratory care.

    Prerequisite(s): RDG-221 ;

    Course previously known as: RADG-415
  
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    RDG-240 - Special Procedures in Radiopharmaceuticals

    2 credits
    A highly-trained team of professionals is necessary to successfully execute the techniques required to obtain diagnostic information during a special procedure. Special procedures are commonly employed to visualize the vascular system or similar hollow organs or vessels. This course will deal with the procedures, the equipment utilized, and the preparation and performance of the procedures.

    Course previously known as: RADG-311
  
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    RDG-252 - Radiation Protection and Biology

    1 credits
    This module is a continuation of RDG-101 . Topics covered include ionizing radiation and x-ray energies. Interactions of radiation with matter and a review of the radiation units of measurement are studied. Dosimetry will cover NRC and NCRP requirements on effective dose equivalent limits, record keeping, monitoring, patient protection, and shielding requirements. Also, an introduction of the state regulation CMR 105 will be given and compared with the federal regulation. Includes a detailed examination of the effects of radiation on the cell, the systems, and the human being, including both long-term and short-term effects, somatic and genetic effects

    Prerequisite(s): RDG-101 , BIO-231 , BIO-232 , PHY-213 ;

    Course previously known as: RADG-419
  
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    RDG-254 - Seminar/Quality Control

    3 credits
    This course will provide the procedures followed in a quality control program, and will examine the benefits of such a program to the radiology department. Also, a review of the entire curriculum of the program, including film critique, will be provided.

    Course previously known as: RADG-413

Respiratory Care

  
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    RCP-104 CCO

    RCP-104 - Introduction to Respiratory Care

    3 credits
    This introductory course includes a study of cardiopulmonary anatomy/physiology, arterial blood gas interpretation, introduction to cardiopulmonary disease, medical terminology, communication skills and ethics. The course is designed to provide the student with fundamental knowledge and theory which will enable the student to understand the more complex theories and practice of respiratory care in subsequent courses.

    Course previously known as: RSPC-104
  
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    RCP-105 CCO

    RCP-105 - Respiratory Care 1

    3 credits
    This course is designed to be a study of respiratory care equipment and the physical principles involved in its use. Among areas to be discussed are: oxygen transport, gas physics, medical gas therapy, gas analyzing equipment, CPR, airway management, and bedside measurement and monitoring devices. The didactic portion consists primarily of lectures, and the clinical hours provide for application of principles learned in the classroom.

    Corequisite(s): RCP 105L  

    Course previously known as: RSPC-105
  
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    RCP-105L - Lab: Respiratory Care 1

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of RCP 105 .

  
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    RCP-106 CCO

    RCP-106 - Respiratory Care 2

    3 credits
    This is the second part of a two-semester course which integrates physical principles with their application to clinical equipment. Application of humidity and aerosol therapy, infection control, hyperinflation therapy, postural drainage therapy suctioning airways, and basics of mechanical ventilation will be discussed. The didactic portion consists primarily of lectures, and the clinical hours provide for application of principles learned in the classroom.

    Corequisite(s): RCP 106L  

    Course previously known as: RSPC-205
  
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    RCP-106L - Lab: Respiratory Care 2

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of RCP 106 .

    Prerequisite(s):
     

    Corequisite(s): RCP-106.

  
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    RCP-107 CCO

    RCP-107 - Respiratory Care 3

    3 credits
    This course is a study in clinical assessment in respiratory care. Topics to be covered are fundamentals of respiratory assessment, interpretation of blood gases, clinical application of the chest radiograph, clinical laboratory studies, advanced assessment techniques, assessment of sleep and breathing and special procedures. Equipment and current trends in these areas will be examined. The didactic portion consists primarily of lectures and the clinical hours provide application of principles learned in the classroom.

    Course previously known as: RSPC-207
  
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    RCP-115 - Respiratory Care 4

    2 credits
    This course is an extensive study of general applications, contraindications and hazards of pharmacological agents used in the treatment of cardiopulmonary diseases. Calculation of dosages and mechanical means of application of medication will be covered.

    Corequisite(s): RCP-116  

    Course previously known as: RSPC-215
  
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    RCP-116 - Respiratory Care Practicum 1 (sum 8 Wks)

    4 credits
    The clinical, bedside and laboratory application of respiratory care is presented, utilizing the facilities of affiliated clinical sites and College laboratory under supervision of hospital respiratory care practitioners, physicians and College faculty. Clinical affiliation is designed to expose students to an environment in which they can practice respiratory care.

    Corequisite(s): RCP-115  

    Course previously known as: RSPC-216
  
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    RCP-203 CCO

    RCP-203 - Intensive Respiratory Care

    3 credits
    An in-depth study of the principles of mechanical ventilation while in the adult, pediatric and neonatal intensive care. Theory/application of mechanical ventilation will be discussed in detail.

    Course previously known as: RSPC-303
  
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    RCP-205 CCO

    RCP-205 - Pulmonary Function Testing

    3 credits
    This course will examine in detail equipment, diagnostic testing, interpretation and the patterns of various respiratory diseases. Students learn how to use equipment in various pulmonary function labs.

    Course previously known as: RSPC-305
  
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    RCP-206 CCO

    RCP-206 - Resp. Care Appl/Clinical Science 1

    2 credits
    This course is offered over two semesters and encompasses physiology of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems and physiology designed to prepare the student for clinical judgment in respiratory care. Topics related to respiratory function, acid-base balance and ventilation and perfusion relationship are included.

    Course previously known as: RSPC-306
  
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    RCP-208 CCO

    RCP-208 - Respiratory Care 6

    3 credits
    This course is a study in hemodynamic monitoring electrocardiography, ACLS and preparation for the NBRC advanced practitioner exam. Students will learn how to take the RRT simulation exam. The final exam will be self-assessment exam (NBRC Registry exams) written and simulation.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO-232 - Anatomy & Physiology 2     

    Course previously known as: RSPC-408
  
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    RCP-209 CCO

    RCP-209 - Neonatal and Pediatric Care

    3 credits
    This course offers the foundation of neonatal and pediatric respiratory care, from anatomic and physiologic development of the cardiopulmonary system to various disease states. The course will focus on etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis treatment and prevention for each disease state. Evaluation of the neonatal and pediatric patient will include history, physical and clinical assessments as well as radiologic evaluations.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO-232  RCP-205  RCP-203 ;

    Course previously known as: RSPC-409
  
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    RCP-211 CCO

    RCP-211 - Respiratory Care Applications/Clinical Science 2

    1 credits
    This is the second part of a two-semester course encompassing pulmonary pathology. Special emphasis is placed on the etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of pulmonary diseases.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO-114  BIO-232  RCP-206 ;

    Course previously known as: RSPC-411
  
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    RCP-212 CCO

    RCP-212 - Respiratory Care Practicum 2

    5 credits
    The clinical, bedside, and laboratory application of respiratory care is presented, utilizing the facilities of affiliated clinical sites and College laboratory under supervision of hospital respiratory care practitioners, physicians, and College faculty. Clinical affiliation is designed to expose students to an environment in which they can practice respiratory care.

    Prerequisite(s): RCP-115  RCP-116  BIO-235 ;

    Course previously known as: RSPC-312
  
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    RCP-213 CCO

    RCP-213 - Respiratory Care Practicum 3

    4 credits
    The clinical, bedside and laboratory application of respiratory care is presented, utilizing the facilities of affiliated clinical sites and College laboratory under supervision of hospital respiratory care practitioners, physicians and College faculty. Clinical affiliation is designed to expose students to an environment in which they can practice respiratory care.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO-114  BIO-232  

    Course previously known as: RSPC-412
  
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    RCP-215 CCO

    RCP-215 - Trends in Respiratory Care

    2 credits
    This course is a study in health care reform, pulmonary rehabilitation, home respiratory equipment, reimbursement, evidence-based medicine, current trends in respiratory care delivery methods, human growth and development, (ACLS) and (PEARS).

    Prerequisite(s):     

    Corequisite(s): RCP 215L  

    Course previously known as: RSPC-415
  
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    RCP-215L - Lab: Trends in Resipiratory Care

    1 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of RCP 215  

    Prerequisite(s): RCP 203    RCP 205  


SIMS Medical Center

  
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    SMC-115 CCO

    SMC-115 - Community Health Worker: Roles and Responsibilities

    2 credits
    This course will explore the basic roles and responsibilities of the community health worker as a member of the healthcare and social service workforce. Student will learn about the history of community health work. The context in which health disparities exist, and about the role of the community health worker in bridging these disparities to increase access to quality care in marginalized communities. Students will also learn about basic skills required of a community health worker.

    Course previously known as: SIMS-115
  
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    SMC-125 - EMT Basic

    5 credits
    The EMT course covers all emergency medical concepts and techniques currently considered to be within the responsibilities of the EMT-Basic (EMT-B) providing emergency care in a pre-hospital setting as set forth by the Office of Emergency Medical Services for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. This course meets or exceeds course requirements established by the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Massachusetts Office of Emergency Medical Services. The course will also cover topics related to future trends and care methodologies in emergency medicine.

    Prerequisite(s):
    • High school diploma or G.E.D.
    • Current health insurance.
    • Have a valid email address and regular access to a computer.
    • Current CPR Certification.
    • CORI/SORI Verification.
    • Be 18 years of age.
    • Be of good mental and physical health and be able to lift and carry 100 to 150 pounds.
    • Be a U.S. Citizen or have a legal right to work in the U.S.
    • Current Medical Liability Insurance (submitted after acceptance into program).
    • 11 Panel Urine Drug Screen- Negative within nine months from the start of class, may be subject to additional screenings during course.
    • Completion of physical examination and college health requirements including documentation of required vaccinations.


    Corequisite(s): SMC-125L  

  
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    SMC-125L - Lab: EMT Basic

    2 credits
    This is the Laboratory Component of SMC-125  

    Corequisite(s): SMC-125  

  
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    SMC-151 - Patient Care Technician

    3 credits
    The goal of this course is to prepare a Certified Nurse Aide to work as a Patient Care Technician in the Acute Care or other approved settings in a hospital environment. It is a fast paced course with intense hands-on education. Students must attend lecture, lab, and all patient simulations. Approved uniform, text and limited equipment required. One lecture and 4 clinical hours.

    Corequisite(s):   and SMC 151L  

    Course previously known as: SIMS-161
  
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    SMC-151L - Lab: Patient Care Technician

    2 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of SMC 151  .

  
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    SMC-156 - Patient Care Technician Clinical

    3 credits
    This course must be taken at the same time as  . The Patient Care Technician student will apply the knowledge and skills learned in   by caring for patients in SIMS Medical Center, the Virtual Teaching Hospital at Springfield Technical Community College and in approved off-campus medical facilities. Approved uniform, text and limited equipment required. Student is responsible for travel for off campus experiences. Three lecture and twelve clinical hours.

    Corequisite(s):   SMC-156L

    Course previously known as: SIMS-166
  
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    SMC-161 - Sterile Processing Technician

    6 credits
    This course provides the fundamentals of central service supply, processing, and distribution (CSD). Instruction and practice is given in aseptic technique. Patient centered practices and theories, customer service, and overall policies and practices of the central service supply departments. Students who successfully complete this program are eligible to take the International Association of Healthcare Central Service Material Management (IAHCSMM) and/or Certification Board for Sterile Processing and Distribution (CPSPD) certifying exam(s). Three lecture and 6 laboratory hours.

    Corequisite(s): SMC-161L

    Course previously known as: SIMS-171
  
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    SMC-175 CCO

    SMC-175 - Community Health Worker: Theory and Methods

    4 credits
    This course will explore teaching, facilitation, advocacy and community organizing skills required of a community health worker. Students will learn theory and methods for implementing best practices in community health work with individuals and with groups. Students will be required to complete a field experience to practice the skills learned in class through lecture, role play and patient simulation.

    Corequisite(s): SMC-115 ;

    Course previously known as: SIMS-215

Small Business Entrepreneurship

  
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    ENT-101 CCO

    ENT-101 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship

    3 credits
    This course is designed to introduce students to the entrepreneurial process from conception to birth of a new venture. Students will examine elements in the entrepreneurial process-personal, sociologist, and environmental-that give birth to a new enterprise. Critical factors for starting a new enterprise such as alternative career prospects, family, friends, role models, the state of the economy and the availability of resources will be explored. Students will be introduced to practical tools they can use to further their careers in business, both in entrepreneurship and in more traditional company environments. This course simulates the experiences the entrepreneurs undergo in conceiving, launching, and operating new businesses. The course enables students to evaluate an entrepreneurial career for themselves. In doing so, it provides want-to-be entrepreneurs with a framework for selecting, funding, and starting their own new ventures.

    Course previously known as: SMBE-125
  
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    ENT-250 CCO

    ENT-250 - Small Business Seminar

    3 credits
    This course is designed to expose the student to the challenges of starting, operating, and evaluating the effectiveness of the small business. Major topics studied include entrepreneurial opportunities, the preparation of a business plan, small business marketing, and the management of small business operations. Financial and administrative controls will be emphasized. The course will be outlined and taught on a case study basis to apply the principles and techniques to the corresponding cases study basic to apply the principles and techniques to the corresponding cases in the text.

    Prerequisite(s): ACC-101 , ENT-101 ,   and MGT-240  

    Course previously known as: SMBE-343
  
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    ENT-260 CCO

    ENT-260 - Entrepreneurial Field Studies

    3 credits
    In this course students will apply their small business knowledge to a real situation. Students will work individually or in a group of no more than three on a significant entrepreneurial project. The curriculum focuses the student on specific concepts, expertise and skills that are the key to successful business start-ups. A typical project involves problem definition, development of the team work plan, completion of research and analysis, derivation of conclusions and recommendations, possibly some implementation, and generation of a final report. This course is based on the concept of balanced mentorship, which benefits both students and the entrepreneur mentor. Students will be assigned to a start-up firm or a firm developing at a business incubator (STCC’s Springfield Enterprise Center.)

    Prerequisite(s): ENT-101 ACC-101     

    Course previously known as: SMBE-440
  
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    ENT-280 - Entrepreneurship Internship 1

    3-9 credits
    This Cooperative Education course allows students to receive academic credit for off-campus educational work experience related directly to their major field of study.  Students who have completed 15 or more credits and who have achieved a 2.5 cum. QPA or higher are eligible to participate in Cooperative Education experiences. Approval for participation must be obtained from the applicable faculty coordinator and the Director of Cooperative Education.


Sociology

  
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    ANT-101 CCO

    ANT-101 - Introduction to Anthropology

    3 credits
    A general introduction to social and cultural anthropology which will explore among the diverse cultures of the world some of the possible variations in technology, economics, social and political organization, art, religion, and ideology. Each year the world grows smaller in each area of communication, transportation, and general economic interdependence. However, an understanding of cultural differences among the people of the world is often lacking. Cultural anthropology provides a systematic description and comparison of the ways of life of groups of people throughout the world. An appreciation of the solutions to human problems developed by other cultures allows not only greater perception of our own way of life, but also of the values and goals of others. The fundamental objective of this course is to provide insight into various ways that people respond to basic needs.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: SOCL-110
  
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    SOC-101 CCO

    SOC-101 - Introduction to Sociology

    3 credits
    An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with a working knowledge of the concepts used by sociologists and with the well-established generalizations in the field. Topics to be discussed include socialization, culture, population, group processes, social stratification ethnic/racial stratification, gender stratification and social change.

    Prerequisite(s): DRG-091  and DWT-099  (or placement at a higher level). ( minimum grade C- ).

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: SOCL-100
  
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    SOC-110 CCO

    SOC-110 - Sexuality & Society: The Social Organization/Sexuality

    3 credits
    Human sexuality will be considered from social, historical, cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives. A comprehensive examination of the scientific study of human sexuality with emphasis on the sociological perspective and the contributions of social scientists.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC-101  ( minimum grade D ).

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: SOCL-140
  
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    SOC-115 CCO

    SOC-115 - Sociology of Hip Hop

    3 credits
    For more than forty years, Hip Hop has evolved not only within the confines of American mainstream culture, but it has also become a global movement. This course explores political and aesthetic foundations of Hip Hop parallel to its musical, corporeal, visual, spoken and literary manifestations in U.S. culture. How the media portrays and “profits” from hip-hop’s impact will also be explored. Some topics that will be discussed include but are not limited to: gender relations, cross-cultural impact, identity formation, sexism, and homophobia, and the differences among Hiphop, Hip Hop, and hip-hop.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 101  

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

  
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    SOC-117 - Introduction to Ethinic Studies

    3 credits


    This course focuses on the meaning and significance of race, ethnicity, and culture in the United States. Students will be exposed to basic concepts in ethnic studies such as ethnicity, culture, race, socialization, cultural assimilation, acculturation, migration, immigration, social protest, and resistance. This course will be taught from an interdisciplinary perspective, thereby allowing students to build a base from various viewpoints and methodologies including but not limited to historical, cultural, political, economical, and sociological.

     

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 .

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

  
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    SOC-200 CCO

    SOC-200 - Social Problems

    3 credits
    This course applies the principles and concepts of sociology to an understanding of contemporary social problems such as poverty, minority status, crime, alcohol, drug addiction, etc. Emphasis will be on the connection between personal experience and the larger social, political, and economic institutions of society.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC-101  or ANT-101  ( minimum grade D- ).

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: SOCL-200
  
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    SOC-205 CCO

    SOC-205 - Sociology of the Family

    3 credits
    This course will focus on the historical development of the family. Its focal point will be the North American family. Cross-cultural comparison will be used, especially in the study of marriage and kinship practices. Strong emphasis will also be placed on family change and social problems such as domestic violence. It will also include such topics as single parenting, changing gender roles and alternatives to the traditional family. We will apply this knowledge to everyday life experiences.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC-101  ( minimum grade D- ).

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: SOCL-250
  
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    SOC-210 CCO

    SOC-210 - Race and Society

    3 credits
    An introduction to the sociological study of race and race relations. Topics studied include the social construction and fluidity of race and ethnicity, issues of racial inequality and privilege, historical and contemporary race relations, and the embeddedness of racism, prejudice and discrimination in all levels of society.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Behavioral and Social Sciences requirements.

    Course previously known as: SOCL-301

Spanish

  
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    SPN-101 CCO

    SPN-101 - Elementary Spanish 1

    3 credits
    This course introduces the student to the basic grammatical structure and pronunciation of the Spanish language. Communicative content includes: greetings, asking about courses and professions, days of the week, months of the year, and dates, numbers, telling time, discussing family, nationalities and languages, places and activities. Grammatical content includes: Nouns and subject pronouns, “hay”, articles, use of common regular verbs in the present tense, using descriptive and possessive adjectives, conjugating correctly and understanding differences in meaning of ser and estar and using each appropriately, conjugating in the simple present tense the following irregular verbs: tener, venir, ir, irregular “yo” verbs and some stem-changing verbs. Students will also be introduced to the culture, customs and diversity of Spanish-speaking countries.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement at ENG-101  or its equivalent or permission of the instructor.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Humanities and Fine Arts requirements.

    Course previously known as: SPAN-121
  
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    SPN-102 CCO

    SPN-102 - Elementary Spanish 2

    3 credits
    This is a continuation of Elementary Spanish 1, with emphasis on the four basic skills necessary for the mastery of a foreign language: listening, speaking, reading and writing. More sophisticated grammatical and linguistic concepts are introduced and discussed, using the Spanish language as a tool for communication. Students gain the know- ledge of the contemporary thought of Hispanics in the United States and in the Hispanic world. Intense oral drills and practical vocabulary.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN-101  (grade of C or higher), one year of high school Spanish, placement at SPAN-102, or permission of instructor.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Humanities and Fine Arts requirements.

    Course previously known as: SPAN-221
  
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    SPN-111 - Conversational Spanish

    3 credits
    The focus of this course is on speaking and understanding the contemporary idiomatic patterns of the native speaker. Special attention is given to pronunciation and simple conversational patterns. Contemporary themes are emphasized, giving police, firemen medical personnel and other interested groups the ability to express themselves in Spanish.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN-101  

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Humanities and Fine Arts requirements.

    Course previously known as: SPAN-122
  
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    SPN-121 - Conversational Spanish-Medical Personnel

    3 credits
    This course will assist police, fire, and medical personnel in speaking and understanding simple Spanish phrases. Students will practice basic dialogs and useful medical vocabulary to prepare for real world interactions.

    Course previously known as: SPAN-123
  
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    SPN-201 CCO

    SPN-201 - Intermediate Spanish 1

    3 credits
    A review of grammar will be given in this course; oral drills and conversation received special attention. The reading skills and basic writing are further developed. Spanish culture is emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN-102  (grade of C or higher), two years of high school Spanish, placement at SPAN-201, or permission of instructor.

    Mass Transfer Block: Credits earned in this course are counted towards the MassTransfer Block Humanities and Fine Arts requirements.

    Course previously known as: SPAN-321

Sports and Entertainment Management

  
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    SPT-250 CCO

    SPT-250 - Event Management

    3 credits
    All aspects of managing a sports, educational, or entertainment event are analyzed and discussed. During the course, which is generally offered during the spring semester, students will participate in a number of events, both on and off campus. The planning, budgeting, staffing and marketing of events will be covered.

    Prerequisite(s): SPT-101  and SPT-102  

    Course previously known as: SEMT-310

Surgical Technology

  
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    SUR-114 - Introduction to Surgical Technology

    4 credits
    An introduction to surgical technology focusing on selected aspects in the development of surgical technology as a technical profession, concepts of patient care, legal, ethical responsibilities and team members in surgery. Knowledge and skill common to patient care and surgical procedures: asepsis, the environment, sterilization and processing of goods, universal precautions, scrubbing, gowning and gloving, classification and recognition of instruments and supplies are presented in lecture and in the STCC operating room. Surgical terminology is included. Lecture four hours, lab four hours on campus in the STCC operating room and at hospitals.

    Corequisite(s): SUR 114L  

    Course previously known as: SURG-104
  
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    SUR-114L - Lab: Introduction to Surgical Technology

    2 credits
    This course is the laboratory component of SUR 114  .

  
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    SUR-124 - Principles & Practices of Surgical Tech

    4 credits
    Content common to surgical procedures is presented in this course, which builds on   and focuses on such subjects as occupational safety, methods of hemostasis, care and handling of specimens, incisions, wound closure, drains, dressing, needles, suture materials, endoscopic surgery, anesthesia, and complications of surgery. Selected surgical procedures are included as prototypes to explain content. Safe handling of instruments and additional instruments and supplies are included.

    Prerequisite(s): SUR-114    BIO-231  

    Corequisite(s): SUR-127  

    Course previously known as: SURG-204
  
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    SUR-127 - Practices Common to Surgical Procedures

    2 credits
    This laboratory course takes place in the operating room on the STCC campus. Hands-on experiences in planning for, setting up, carrying out, and breaking a case, and preparing and handling supplies and instruments common to most surgical procedures are the focus of this course. The class meets four hours a week for seven weeks. The content from SUR-114  and SUR-124  is integrated into this experience.

    Prerequisite(s): SUR-114  BIO-231  

    Corequisite(s): SUR-124  

    Course previously known as: SURG-207
 

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